Tales from Slacksville

Short stories can be deceptively difficult to write, but when they are done well, they are particularly enjoyable. Tales from Slacksville is a collection of fifteen short stories all pertaining to the fictional town of Slacksville and the people who call the town home. Humorous and engaging, this book is a great option for newly independent and/or reluctant readers who are interested in bite-sized stories that are accessible and memorable. More than once, I found myself grinning as I read this book, and I especially enjoyed how interconnected the individual stories become by the end. Please see my full review below!


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It is hard to imagine a place sillier than Slacksville, where the children are inventive and the town’s claim to fame is a factory that creates custom slacks. Through fifteen short stories, readers meet a variety of the citizens who call Slacksville home within the scope of unusual circumstances. Chickens find their way into the principal’s office, bikes become cars, and centaurs offer rides to children at birthday parties—and these are just a few of the exciting and unique adventures that take place in Slacksville. And while the tales in this book may be unexpected at times, they are recognizable enough to create a link between Slacksville and elsewhere in the world.




Told through an assortment of short stories, this book introduces young readers to the quirky town of Slacksville and the unusual events that take place there. Each story focuses on a different character—each of whom is in either elementary or middle school—and a noteworthy event in their otherwise predictable and ordinary lives. Humor and comical antics pepper the narrative, bringing smiles to readers’ faces as each story unfolds. Though the stories themselves are relatively short, each one is a bite-sized tale that will leave readers grinning while inspiring them to consider their own world in a different way.





This delightful collection of short stories is an excellent addition to libraries serving newer middle grade readers. Young readers can choose to experience these stories either independently or with a caregiver, and no matter whether the stories are read one at a time or in multiples, they flow smoothly from one to the next. Black and white illustrations introduce each chapter, and the cover image itself alludes to several of the tales within the book. While each of the stories can stand alone, they all interconnect to create a more complete and holistic view of the fictional town of Slacksville. And at the end, readers will find teasers for more work by the author. This comic adventure is perfect for fans of family-friendly, silly stories.



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